About your Search

20121101
20121130
STATION
CSPAN 8
CSPAN2 6
CNBC 3
CNNW 1
KNTV (NBC) 1
WBAL (NBC) 1
WRC (NBC) 1
LANGUAGE
English 21
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)
the gentleman from california seek recognition? >> mr. speaker, pursuant to the rules of the house and house resolution 821, i call up h.r. 6429, the stem jobs act of 2012, as amended, and ask for its immediate consideration. the speaker pro tempore: the clerk will report the title of the bill. the clerk: h.r. 6429, a bill to amend the immigration and nationality act to promote innovation, investment, and research in the united states to eliminate the diversity immigrant program, and for other purposes. the speaker pro tempore: pursuant to house resolution 821, an amendment in the nature of a substitute consisting of the text of the rules committee print 112-34, modified by the amendment printed in house report 112-697, is adopted. the bill as amended is considered as read. the gentleman from california, mr. issa, and the gentleman from michigan, mr. conyers, each will control 45 minutes. the chair recognizes the gentleman from california. mr. issa: thank you, mr. speaker. mr. speaker, i ask unanimous consent that all members may have five legislative days to revise and extend their remarks
coastal california to the pacific northwest with mountain sundays. sunday, beautiful day in the northeast, still on the chilly side. more rain, windy conditions on the carolina coastline, north and south carolina. we expect more heavy rain in the pacific northwest, more mountain snows there. nice and sunny mak >>> well, we're starting to get our first heavy wave of moisture. right now it's pushing onshore. we've got steady rainfall from san jose up the peninsula and into san francisco, even the north bay starting to the rather active. our showers are creeping up from the south pushing to the north. embedded within the showers we have a few isolated thunderstorms so keep that in mind. we'll have the heaviest rainfall overnight but look what happens on saturday, getting a nice, dry break. temperatures are going to be cool. 65 inland, 64 bayside and 61 at the coast. parts of being an american, you get to watch sunday night "football night in america." that's right. it's a bitter rivalry. the ravens fly into heinz stadium. will they catch up to the steelers? they relish the fight. clear and c
, i know congressman duncan hunter calling from california, he and i are writing a letter. we encouraged our colleagues to sign that letter to the administration, requiring them to comply with the intent of the law. it is unfortunate we have to do that. hopefully we will see some changes in that regard. thank you. >> thank you very much. in march, we are going to hold a jobs fair for veterans. it is interesting. there is an incredible amount of folks that come up. was meeting with franchiser this morning. they have a new initiative to help veterans get inside that business. we are excited by what that means. he mentioned 244,000 claims. do you keep track of the acceptance rate? do you submit them? how often do they make it through the system successfully? >> thank you. it takes so long for them to travel through the system. it is impossible for us to keep an accurate accounting of how many did not. i will tell you that at the board of veterans' appeals, we keep track of the claims that are returned. it breaks down how many claims every year. they did not break them down by the
-atlantic coast. out west going to be the big story. heavy rain from coastal california all the way into the pacific northwe the pacific northwest. sunday, sunday, beautiful day in the northeast. still on the chilly side. more rain, windy conditions along the carolina coastline, north carolina and south carolina. more mountain snow in the northwest. sunny in the gulf coast. that's what's going on around the country, here's what's happening in your neck of the woods. >> yeah, in our neck of the woods, once again, a chilly start. look at the cloud cover out there right now. your temperature sits at 43 degrees. reagan national springfield, you are coming in in the upper 30s. same for quantico. look at the wet weather. light showers. they are very scattered and drizzle mainly east of d.c. along i-95. 54 for the high today. >> that's your latest weather, and one of the best parts of being an american, you get to watch sunday night "football night in america." that's right. it's a bitter rivalry. the ravens fly into heinz stadium. will they catch up to the steelers? they relish the fight.
be curious to know a little bit about her family, in nevada. what did her father do, why move to california? what were his parents like, what were her mother's parents like? >> we're getting into a tricky area. her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had to travel around -- she did a lot of things. he would talk about his good ventures. he had been made minor. term mother was a first-generation german immigrant and her mother had been married before. her mother was -- her mother came over as a child and stayed and eventually married a man named bender. we move to what the code did we decide it was? north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried hard to find information about the flood that killed him. i called the archives, i spoke to the archivist and could not find a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she had two children. than she married will ryan and they moved to nevada, several towns in nevada and he was a minor. she lost one husband to mining and did not want to lose another one. she was constantly putting pressur
that about her family, born in nevada? what did her father do there? why did he move to california? what were his parents like, her mother's parents like? >> okay, now we're getting into a tricky area. so, her father was the son of irish immigrants, and he had traveled around as an itinerant, he done a lot of different things to get it on a merchant ship. he would talk to her about his adventures, and he had been a minor. her mother was a first generation german immigrant, and her mother had been married before. her mother was, her mother came over as a child within and, ended up staying and eventually, eventually married a man named bender. they moved up to what dakota did was decide it was? was? ivory coast north dakota. moved up to north dakota, and he was killed in a flight up there. now, actually i tried very hard to find information about the floods that killed him. i called the archives. i called, spoke to the archivist and really could not find commit is a lot of information about her mother's first husband. from that marriage she did have two children. and then they moved, then she m
and gentleman, the senator from the state of california, the honorable dianne feinstein. >> mr. speaker, leader pelosi, mrs. bush, leader reed, leader mcconnell, secretary of state hillary clinton and my colleagues in government, this is a special day to honor a special person in a special place. for many years, i have followed the tragedies and victories of this uncommonly courageous and persistent woman. in 1988, she quickly rose to be the voice of democracy in burma, creating the national league for democracy. elections followed in 1990, where her party won 80% of the seats. that joy quickly turned to tragedy. the military junta nullified the election and arrested aung san suu kyi. she would spend the better part of two decades under house arrest, unable even to visit her dying has been -- husband. in 1996, i recall being approached to sponsor a burma sanctions bill. sanctions were only loosened in july of this year. senator mcconnell later became one of aung san suu kyi's chief advocates in the senate and we continued to work on behalf of the people in burma. in 2003, following an assassina
move to california? what were his parents late, her mother's parents late? >> okay, now we are getting into a tricky area. so her father was the son of irish immigrants and he had traveled around sn -- she had done a lot of different things. he would kind of talk to her about these adventures. he had been a minor. her mother was a first-generation german immigrant and hermit there had been very before. her mother came over as a child with an aunt, up staying and eventually married a man named ender. they moved up to, what decoded to recite it was? i think is north dakota. the debt to north dakota and he was killed in a flood up there. actually, i tried very hard to find permission about the flood that killed him. i called the archives. i spoke to the archivist and really could not find a tremendous amount of information about her mother's first test in. from that marriage, she did have two children. then she married will o'bryan and they moved to nevada. actually so the little towns in nevada and he was a minor. but she had lost one has been to miami in she did not want to lose another
programs and savings for people over 50. his speech at the commonwealth club of california is 45 minutes. >> good evening, and welcome to today's meeting of the commonwealth club of california. i am chair of the forum and your host for today. we also welcome the listening audience. we invite everyone to listen to us on line. now, it is my pleasure to introduce the distinguished speaker. mark freidman is ceo and founder of encore.org. second acts for the greater good. he spearheaded the creation of the experience court. largest of america's non-profit programs engaging people over 55. and, the purpose prize that offers prizes to the social innovators said under the second half of life. he was described as the voice of aging baby boomers who are stealing retirement for meaningful work later in life. while the wall street journal stated, in the past decade, mr. friedman has the march as a leading voice in discussions nationwide about the changing face of retirement. he is the author of the big shift, navigating the new stage beyond a midlife, published in april 2011 which they called an ima
and it is a real problem. part of it is the state of california and how it's structured to take claims. but the insurance companies, you know, the point is the cost of workers compensation for our little league as they had to go through the state senate was about 1.5 times the entire compensation of the players and we had a conversation recently with the national football league and i think if you asked them, they would tell you it's a similar program. why is a problem? they think of inheriting a word player played last, the whole thing and nobody objects of course because there are players that have been hurt. if you go back and say you want change this, you and up were dr. cantu is talking about. and then i say wow, we basically have an entire generation we have to deal with because who knows somebody in the southeast conference has perhaps already occurred tmh that isn't going to manifest itself in 15 or 20 years. >> i think you were telling me that the last team that employs the player is the one that picks up all the workers comp. >> and that's not right or wrong. it happens to be
for the landslide reelection of california governor in 2006. before that a top political advice sor in the white house of george w. bush. he attended the university of delaware from 1988 to 1993. david plouffe crossed paths in schmidt in the late 1980's. he completed his political seasons degree and finned two years ago. he has completed two presidential bids. he was appointed as a senior advice sor to the president in the white house in 2011. he attended is the marks high school before serving in a wide viret of state and national political campaigns. i'm going to ask the two speakers this evening to speak and i had to decide who is going to go first and i decided to use a standard that anyone this this audience could mean and that is whoever has won the most recent presidential election gets to speak first. i think that's the fair enough thing to do so please welcome david plouffe and steve schmidt to the university of delaware. [applause] >> thank you for joining thus evening. it's great to be back where steve and i had our interest in politics fostered and have such great memories of the uni
. in higher third of unemployment. what else is dark? california is dark. these are safe democratic states. where is unemployment low? from north dakota down to oklahoma none of that is going for obama. only one place perhaps. virginia is a potential swing state and also wisconsin. maybe that low rate is a precondition for obama to potentially win it. let's look at the change. again, very similar. darker is less change. less improving unemployment. new york, not a good state for change of unemployment over the last year but probably safely in the obama camp. the one place you might want to look here, nevada, florida, north carolina and virginia. those are all potentially in play because they had some improvement in the unemployment rate and if that had not been there, they might have been for romney. i would like to give you a definitive answer. you have the level of unemployment and you have the change. that's what makes this a horse race, simon. >> it's fascinating to see that the way you slice and dice going into the election whether it's turnout or amazing. steve, thank you very much.
bookstores in america like cody's bookstore in berkeley, california, was firebombed. at a bookstore in london that was firebombed toys. bookstores all over the world that were attacked, not just burn but actually people going into bookstores and threatening people working there. and in publishing companies and then, well, the great tragedy was the books, the japanese translator, was murdered at his university in japan. and there was intent to murder and norwegian publisher and the italian translator of the book, for both fortunately survived. but this was a shooting war. and the point is that in all these cases, the evidence that emerged showed that these were professional hits. >> this was not spontaneous. >> no, no. these were professional hits. and so basically the danger was very high. until this moment in around the turn-of-the-century, when we finally managed to get the iranians to back down. and at the point at which we are convinced certain that the action had stood down these gangs of killers, really most of the danger went away. >> dr. hatchett and to this next question. what is the
for how they deal with higher education. you have some states like california which has been the premier example planning for the last 50 years. the state university of new york, you know. then you have michigan. and michigan, since the frontier days, has selected anarchy. what that means is each of the 15 public campuses and in the state have constitutional autonomy. we have no umbrella organization, and a shield -- no shield. the philosophy has allowed the university of michigan to develop with one of the los all levels of support. actually, no support at all for education until the late 19th century. they spent all the money but came from selling land and kept it. the university of michigan has learned from that. and consciously over the last several decades has redesigned itself. through a variety of steps, pushing the cold -- the control of resources, the responsibility down to the lowest possible level. that created an organization that was an extraordinarily adapted to change and which at the helm, there's very little concern at all. in fact, the steering wheel was not even connec
. it is that legal trade that we seek to preserve. we have a disconnect. california and arizona and new mexico have about 14-plus arizona -- asians for border now. we have barely over six. we have had a buildup that has put such raid across through texas. i do want to work with you, congressman. the american people want the truth. they want the truth of what is taking place. people are stepping up and saying that. the truth is there is a runaround. we need those resources. we need parity with our sister states. >> the reason we have to work together as democrats and republicans, i am in the homeland security committee and the ag and tea. i would be happy to talk to about how the majority have stopped bills. talk about people and farms -- it is important for texas -- it is about to expire september 30. on this issue, we have to work together, because democrats and republicans -- we had in homeland to add 1000 new border patrols. i cannot have to tell you how it went. i voted in favor. once i said no, we said yes. i said -- if you say that the borders are a war zone, why don't we put the border patro
about the evolution of facebook at a conference at the university of california san diego. this is about 50 minutes. >> thanks, everyone for coming. i do think this is actually a bit of a treat. i have been covering facebook for years and years, and you rarely see chris cox out here doing his visionary thing that you are about to get. your title as the vp of product, which is a suspiciously vague title -- what do you actually do on a day-to-day basis? >> over the last three years, i have built out the product management and the design teams. each group of people that is building a new feature or product has a bunch of engineers, a product manager, and some designers. i have been responsible for building out the product management and design and functions at facebook. >> for people who might not think of product the way you do, what is a product on facebook? >> the like button is a product. newsfeed is a product. your timeline is a product that facebook delivers. it is a little bit of an interesting twist on a product because a product in a lot of consumer technology companies would be li
is standing outside a walmart in paramount, california. you were in the middle of the protests today. tell us what happened. >> reporter: this is a very large protest here, joe. there were at the height of this the l.a. county sheriff's department estimating about 1,000 protesters in or around this particular walmart. and this protest, it was loud, it was ruckus, it was the very opposite of what you might expect on a black friday shopping day here at a walmart. and that's the point. the employees who walked off the job joined by many supporters and labor say they want today make the point to management that they want to have a fair discussion about pay, about health care as well about the hours that they work. they chose black friday, a very potent day to make that point. here's what an employee as well as a shopper told us what they think. >> they say do this, do that. none of it works. this is the only way we can get our voice out there is speaking with the media, the public. >> just a matter that they have to, you know, do things right for the employees. >> doing things right for the emplo
to set up offices in chicago, first of all, or california, and i don't know who are the people who are going to staff and man those offices to actually trade on behalf of somebody, it's not clear to me how this works. it may very well be that when you have a massive superstorm the size of sandy that knocks out an entire coast or region that it's almost impossible to have true contingency planning. >> two things. good point. first of all, you do need to have some senior people who aren't necessarily located in the proximity of devastation. yes, you do need some senior people but in this circumstance, this is one of the things we learned, andrew, is that since they weren't sure the large traders weren't sure about whether or not they could enter the orders into the new york stock exchange, they actually sent people to archipelago to try to work on the computers, in the middle of this storm, so just a really sort of a cluster and hopefully we can do better in the future. >> what happened to your own next -- isn't this a transatlantic company that has platforms on both sides of the oce
francisco, california. david, thank you for joining us. i want to talk about the earnings in just a little bit, but first a lot of people look at this, you've been growing so quickly, why are you starting to tap the brakes a bit in terms of taking delivery of aircraft as well as expand manage to new markets? >> i think a couple of things here. first of all, we felt the need to get to critical mass which we believe we've done. we have 50 aircraft now. and so we feel comfortable slowing down the growth. but i would say the key thing we've seen in the two years since we in addition will made the order is the increase in fuel prices and basically what is a slowly growing economy. and when you do the math, it doesn't make sense to go in and continue the rapid expansion. >> part of this tapping the brakes, if you will, is slowing down the rate and pace of taking new aircraft from airbus. some people say wait a second, those will be more fuel efficient, why wouldn't you want those sooner rather than later because you're deferring accepting some of those aircraft. >> we're in a little bit of a dif
stanford, california is. went to berkeley to get away from stanford. a state political theory. now was hired by a man i was working for as an assistant well was a student. the rest is history. >> of want to give him this comment. what influence to you think mr. hichens writing hand along with shaping women's history? >> i am not sure i know that he was the most egalitarian, seriously. he was absolutely -- he thought of women and men as complete equals. he wrote that piece for vanity fair. you know, it was one more assignment command eroded. if you actually read it does not -- the article does not say what the title might imply. yes. he was so nonsexist for a guy who was such a man's man in so loved by women. very charismatic. women adored him. he did not play the sexual cardinal. i don't know if he has a place in women's history perce, but just in the liberation of all groups. he would definitely have thought that the better law made sense. he would never think a woman should make less than a man. think maybe there is just -- that's it. i have nothing to say more. >> just a couple
Search Results 0 to 20 of about 21 (some duplicates have been removed)